Last edited by Todal
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

6 edition of Dyes from lichens & plants found in the catalog.

Dyes from lichens & plants

McGrath, Judy Waldner

Dyes from lichens & plants

by McGrath, Judy Waldner

  • 314 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by Van Nostrand Reinhold in Toronto, New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Dyes and dyeing, Domestic.,
  • Dye plants.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJudy Waldner McGrath.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination144 p., [8] leaves of col. plates :
    Number of Pages144
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14652534M
    ISBN 100442298587

    Noted textile designer and lichen expert explains how to create and use dyes derived from lichens. Text covers history of the use of lichen pigments, safe dyeing methods, ecologically sound dyeing, and use of mordants, lichen identification, and more. Here is a complete guide to making and using dyes from a wide variety of plants — from acorn to zinnia. For each plant: suitability for dyeing, parts to use, processing, availability, fastness of dye, more. Includes list of suppliers, metric conversion table, and bibliography.

      Books on Dyeing with Fungi Lichen Dyes The New Source Book by Karen Diadick Casselman. Mushrooms Are to Dye For by Carol Lee. The Rainbow Beneath My Feet: a Mushroom Dyer’s Field Guide by Arleen and Alan Bessette Dyes from lichens & plants, Judy Waldner McGrath, Toronto: Van Nostrand Reinhold, Author: Sue Gazell. Plants, invertebrates and minerals are all sources of natural dyes with the majority derived from plant sources such as roots, berries, bark, leaves, lichen and fungi. There are a vast number of plants from which you can obtain dye.

    Get this from a library! Nature's colors: dyes from plants. [Ida Grae] -- "Two hundred and sixty-eight recipes for natural dyes are fully tested and proportioned for practical home preparation."--Publisher description. Natural dyes are dyes or colorants derived from plants, invertebrates, or minerals. The majority of natural dyes are vegetable dyes from plant sources—roots, berries, bark, leaves, and wood—and other biological sources such as fungi and lichens. Archaeologists have found evidence of textile dyeing dating back to the Neolithic period. In China, dyeing with plants, barks and insects has .


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Dyes from lichens & plants by McGrath, Judy Waldner Download PDF EPUB FB2

Dyes from Lichens and Plants Hardcover – January 1, by Judy Waldner McGrath (Author)5/5(1). Dyes From Lichens & Plants Hardcover – January 1, by Judy Waldner McGrath (Author)5/5(1). Lichens are curious plants, composed of fungi and algae that often resemble splotches of paint peeling from rocks or wood.

They have been used to create brilliant, versatile dyes for over 4, years.4/5. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Dyes from lichens & plants by McGrath, Judy Waldner; 1 edition; First published in ; Subjects: Domestic Dyes and dyeing, Dye plants, Dyes.

Lichen Dyes: The New Source Book. Lichens are curious plants, composed of fungi and algae that often resemble splotches of paint peeling from rocks or wood. They have been used to create brilliant, versatile dyes for over 4, years.

The majority of natural dyes are vegetable dyes from plant sources -roots, berries, bark, leaves, and wood - and other organic sources such as fungi and lichens. Archaeologists have found evidence of textile dyeing dating back to the Neolithic period.

In China, dyeing with plants, barks and insects has been traced back more than 5, years. Lichen dyes are substantive, meaning no mordant is needed. All Lichens contain acids that hold precursors of colors.

Some lichens have certain acids that give more dramatic colors than others. But all can be used for dyeing and none need a mordant. The ratio of lichen to water is 2 cup of lichen for 1 ounce of fiber. Lichen dyes are substantive, meaning no mordant needed. All lichens contain acids that hold precursors of colors.

It's not until after you dye that you can play and use modifiers to alter the color. 42 rows  Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) was used to produce red dyes. Green dyes. Buy a cheap copy of Lichen Dyes: The New Source Book by Karen Diadick Casselman.

Noted textile designer and lichen expert explains how to create and use dyes derived from lichens. Text covers history of the use of lichen pigments, safe dyeing Free shipping over $/5(2). Get this from a library.

Dyes from lichens & plants. [Judy Waldner McGrath] -- Describes natural dyes found in the Spence Bay area. Lichens are curious plants, composed of fungi and algae that often resemble splotches of paint peeling from rocks or wood.

They have been used to. The Lichen Dyes Some of the most useful dyes and the least known are to be found among the Lichens.

They seem to have been used among peasant dyers from remote ages, but apparently none of the great French dyers used them, nor are they mentioned in any of the old books on dyeing.

The only Lichen dyes that are known generally among dyers are. Lichens are interesting organisms. They are diverse, adaptable, functional, and little understood. They play an important role in our natural ecosystems and can let us know when those ecosystems are in trouble.

Lichens are beautiful, especially when you view a lichen-drenched Douglas-fir or a colorful crust-covered cliff, and up close when viewed under a hand-lens or.

color-changing dyes. There are a large number of lichens that produce bold reddish-brown dyes in boiling water. Dye instructions As with most natural dyes, lichen dyes work best on wool or silk that has been washed to remove oils. Cotton and other plant fibers may take the dye, but without additional treatments, the colors will beFile Size: 2MB.

Dyes from Lichens and Plants by McGrath, Judy Waldner and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at - Dyes from Lichens and Plants by Mcgrath, Judy Waldner - AbeBooks. Alkaline dyebaths (like ammonia or urine) will dye plant-based fibers better. Sonme natural dyes are indicators.

Dark Cherry, Red Cabbage and Red Onions will be red or pink in an acidic environment (like for wool), but will result in a blue or violet dye in an alkaline environment (like for cotton or linen). p., [8] leaves of plates: 22 x 25 cmPages: Mycopigments are the colorful dyes found within the flesh of certain fungi and lichens.

Learn more about dyeing with mycopigments, register for classes, and shop the tools of the trade. The dyes extracted were tested on silk, tussar silk, absorbent cotton and a co-relation of dye colour with the lichen substance present was also made. The lichens produced orange, yellow, blue.

Lichen Dyes. Lichens have been used in medicine, food, and even liquor and cosmetics. More commonly, lichens are used for dying fabrics. There are two types of lichen dye: boiling water dyes, which produce yellows and browns; and fermentation dyes, which produce reds and : Samantha D'Acunto.Cook your plant dyes outside if possible, and keep your dye pots separate from your cooking pots.” It helps to add a mordant, or fixing agent (like Alum) to some plant dyes to ensure the color holds to the fabric.

But this process is basically the color version of wild fermentation – so experiment, and build your knowledge. Lichen Dyes: The New Source Book Paperback – 14 May Casselman is perhaps the leading expert on dyeing textiles with plants, especially lichens.

Reading anything by her is well worth it and this tiny book is overflowing with information. It takes up hardly any room on my shelf, but is the one dye book I refer to most s: